Teaching Learning Leading K-12

107: Nathan Fox and the LSAT

August 8, 2016

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Nathan is a teacher. 

He teaches college students who think that they want to attend law school how to take the LSAT to get accepted to law school. His test prep books are easy to read and actually fun to read. 

Yes, I am telling you that test prep can be fun, at least Nathan's version.

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He likes teaching, but he has not always known that this is what he wanted to do. He has a couple of different degrees and has travelled down the pathway of different careers. When he knew that he wasn't on the right path he took the LSAT and scored a 179. A perfect score is 180. He got accepted to a prestigious law school and shortly after beginning the coursework he realized that this wasn't his calling, either.

He discovered that he wanted to teach people how to take the test. He saw the test as a game and knew that he could help others be successful on the test.

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Nathan and I talk about the way he writes. I like the way he writes. He is funny, poignant and he makes you want to keep reading. He gives credit to what he calls his "core philosophy as a teacher, tell the truth at all times." 

Nathan continues to recall the advice of a friend who told him, to tell the truth. 

"I walked into that first class really nervous..." and I said, " Hey guys I'm Nathan. I am contractually obligated by my employer not to tell you that this is the first LSAT class that I have ever taught. 

A couple of them laughed and smiled. From that moment they were on my side..."

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Check out Nathan's ideas about teaching his students how to get to understand what the test is asking and to actually see it as fun. He has amazing advice for test taking. What could you learn from his suggestions? What about listening to his ideas about why he spends a lot of time talking people out  of going to law school. How could his thoughts help you when you talk to and teach your students? 

By the way, check out his audio podcast Thinking LSAT

Connect with Nathan to find out more.

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